Tag Archives: AVCHD

[HOWTO] Workaround for a broken AVCHD playback with VDPAU on Karmic

The release of Karmic Koala inspired me to upgrade to this new Ubuntu 9.10 version and also to install the latest My Media System (a light Media Center for Linux), wich is version 1.1.2 actually. All was fine, beside the playback of AVCHD footage from my Canon HF100 FullHD camcorder. I’ve noticed already some time ago, AVCHD footage doesn’t work with the ‘-fps 50‘ switch anymore. The solution for the problem, so I wrote, was to use ‘-correct-pts‘ instead. Continue reading

XBMC on Karmic with VDPAU and VDR

If I read the title “XBMC on Karmic with VDPAU and VDR“, then I think not many people out there, beside the experts, understand what this is all about. It’s about a good looking Media Center for Linux, which can handle HD content from your camcorder or HDTV streams from cable or satellite. Read here about the available PPA repositories, the differences between them and how to set this whole thing up, without loosing the overview. Continue reading

New Mplayer slows down AVCHD footage

I’ve built the latest mplayer trunk (r29664) in order being able to play back 3gp videos with sound. All was fine and my 3gp videos had sound after I’ve installed the appropriate libraries, built and compiled the current mplayer version.
But after a while I’ve noticed, that mplayer, no matter how I’ve invoked it (with or without my mplayer-vdpau wrapper script for My Media System), played back my AVCHD footage from my Canon HF100 in slow motion (e.g. half speed), and the sound of course wasn’t in sync either. Continue reading

VDPAU and Window Manager on Jaunty Jackalope – Ubuntu 9.04

Today I did it. I’ve upgraded my system from Intrepid Ibex(8.10) onto Jaunty Jackalope (9.04). My Ubuntu x86_64 installation offered me, as always, a couple of new packages for update, and as I wanted to update, a message box told me, I could do a whole system upgrade onto Jaunty Jackalope. So I did and it worked. I took a very long time (>1h), but I had no unpleasant surprises afterwards.
All special sources.conf entries in my apt-get config have been commented out, and I started from scratch using a new Ubuntu installation.
Continue reading

VDPAU: stable 180.44 and 185.19 beta driver

There are two major highlights about the two last released Nvidia VDPAU drivers. The first one is, that the stable driver 180.44 fixed an ugly bug in the x86_64 branch, concerning the VC-1 playback. And the second even better news is, that the ugly resource problem seems to be fixed in the 185.19 beta driver. Even systems with on-board graphics adapters (shared graphics memory) seem to work now without any issues anymore.

Here are the the release news from the VDPAU point of view: Continue reading

CoreAVC 1.9.5 released

I didn’t intend to write about CoreAVC anymore, since VDPAU from NVIDIA is doing its job more than excellently for me. Major parts of this Blog are actually about it. Nevertheless I’ve read through the changelog of the release of 1.9.5. And what must I see? They’ve fixed the Canon HF100 seeking issues. This is their changelog like they’ve posted in their forum. Continue reading

CoreAVC 1.9.0 for Linux (howto for Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10)

I stated here, I won’t touch CoreAVC for Linux anymore, because VDPAU is performing so well, but since so many visitors were attracted by my last short article about CoreAVC 1.9.0, I decided to look a bit closer at it.
I’ve compiled two versions of mplayer and they worked more or less good for me (read below): Continue reading

VDPAU: does my graphics card support VC-1

[UPDATE]Since Nvidia driver version 180.35 almost all Nvidia graphics cards starting with the 8xxx series are able to play back VC-1 content.[/UPDATE]
VC-1 is one of three open standards for HD DVD and more important these days, the Blu-Ray disk.

If you’ve already bought a graphics cards, and you are not certain if your card support VC-1 with Nvidias new VDPAU driver, you’ve got two possibilities to find out if your card does support VC-1 natively.
Install nvclock: Continue reading